brats, burgers and the boss
lucia

show me your nuts?

Screws
 

i discovered my scoota lost a couple screws recently.  my theory - last week I rode it down a bumpy trail to a beach.  either that or a sunday morning trip i took to the vlad motor inn to grab breakfast.  end result, the scoot is permanently parked until i get some replacements.  i'm terrible when it comes to shopping for parts through local vendors.  and since the screws are off an italian scooter, i suspect it's not going to be easy to find a match here in vladivostok.  so instead, i looked online and found boltdepot.com.  i ended up buying the bolts i needed plus a few storage trays to organize the growing collection of jars, bags and boxes of parts i've accumulated over that last few years.  you'd think i'd be travel light but it's easier to carry your own little line of hardware store parts, than to track down a u.s. steel grade 9/16 hex bolt. i remember waiting 3 days just to find a couple U bolts in sudan.

my russian classes have been picking lately.  i've been learning more about locations and directions. the part i enjoy is learning how to say "where" than anything else. 

  • где      - "где магазин?"        "where is the store?" (prepositional)
  • куда    - "куда вы идёте?"     "where are you going?" (accusative)
  • откуда - "откуда вы едете?"  "where are you coming from (genitive)

you'll notice in the last two examples, идёте and едете are different words meaning "to go".  the significance is, if someone is traveling by foot идёте is used. if they are traveling by some mode of transportation, едете is used.

if i'm talking about myself and where i am going now, i would say "я иду на почта" (i am going to the post office). it's very important to understand how to conjugate the verb so the listener understand who is doing what.  i've been wrapping my brain around what changes if i say "I, you, he, she, we, they, etc".  it's actually a cool way to express what's happening. every verb turns into a new sounding word. here's an example of the verb говорить -  "to speak" (imperfective aspect - present tense)

  • я (I)                         говорю
  • ты (you-informal)      говоришь
  • он/она (he/she)        говорит  
  • мы (we)                   говорим
  • вы (you-formal)        говорите
  • они (they)                говорят

i wish i had the advantage of taking classes everyday, because work tends to disrupt my rhythm by my second class for the week.  i know i'd excelerate my learning curve if i could spend more time with the language.  but i do get every opportunity to practice throughout the week with everyone from coworkers to total strangers.  one thing i've noticed is i'm not shy about blurting out the wrong words.  someone corrects me and i'm the better for it.  i remember it better that way compared to trying to look it up myself.

current favorite word - "устали" (we/you/they are tired). but that's past tense and a post for another time.

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